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Home / Career / Film Productions
Captain America: Civil War
019.jpg Original Release: May 6, 2016
Genre: Action | Adventure | Sci-Fi
Running time: 147 minutes
Directed by: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo
Screenplay by: Christopher Markus, Stephen McFeely
Produced by: Kevin Feige
Distributed by: Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
Budget: $250 million
Box Office
: $1.153 billion

With many people fearing the actions of super heroes, the government decides to push for the Hero Registration Act, a law that limits a hero’s actions. This results in a division in The Avengers. Iron Man stands with this Act, claiming that their actions must be kept in check otherwise cities will continue to be destroyed, but Captain America feels that saving the world is daring enough and that they cannot rely on the government to protect the world. This escalates into an all-out war between Team Iron Man (Iron Man, Black Panther, Vision, Black Widow, War Machine, and Spider-Man) and Team Captain America (Captain America, Bucky Barnes, Falcon, Scarlet Witch, Hawkeye, and Ant Man) while a new villain emerges.

Cast & Characters

Robert Downey Jr. (Tony Stark / Iron Man), Chris Evans (Steve Rogers / Captain America), Scarlett Johansson (Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow), Jeremy Renner (Clint Barton / Hawkeye), Don Cheadle (James Rhodes / War Machine), Elizabeth Olsen (Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch), Paul Bettany (Vision), Anthony Mackie (Sam Wilson / The Falcon), Sebastian Stan (Bucky Barnes / Winter Soldier), Anthony Mackie (Sam Wilson / Falcon), Chadwick Boseman (T’Challa / Black Panther), Paul Rudd (Scott Lang / Ant-Man), Emily VanCamp (Sharon Carter), Tom Holland (Peter Parker / Spider-Man), Frank Grillo (Brock Rumlow / Crossbones), William Hurt (Thaddeus “Thunderbolt” Ross), Daniel Brühl (Helmut Zemo).

Production Photos

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Production Notes

In March 2014, Anthony and Joe Russo confirmed that they had signed on to return as directors for a third Captain America film, along with Chris Evans as Captain America, Kevin Feige as producer, and Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely as screenwriters. Markus and McFeely had been working on the screenplay since late 2013, while the Russo brothers began work in February 2014. The re-hiring of the directors, three months before the release of Captain America: The Winter Soldier, came as a result of Marvel executives being impressed with test screenings of that film.

In August 2014, the Russos stated that the film would be set “a couple years” after The Winter Soldier, and would continue to focus on Steve Rogers’ relationship with Bucky Barnes as well as the political themes related to Captain America. Anthony stated, “The character was invented for an explicitly political purpose. So it’s hard to get away from that nature.” The Russos also said that they would be “bringing some new elements to the table that will give us a twist on Winter Soldier“, and indicated that filming was scheduled to begin in Atlanta. They described themselves as “ecstatic” with a first draft of the screenplay submitted by Markus and McFeely, and also stated that the film’s title would be announced “in a month or so at most”, and that the concept and title for the film came from Feige, who had it “for a while”. In September, Joe expanded by saying the film would have another “big idea that alters the universe as a whole in some way” similar to S.H.I.E.L.D. falling in The Winter Soldier. The rest of the film, such as the characters, story, and tone, would be left open to the Russos’ and writers’ interpretations.

In November 2014, Daniel Brühl joined the cast in an unspecified role, while Anthony Mackie and Frank Grillo were confirmed to return as Sam Wilson / Falcon and Brock Rumlow / Crossbones, respectively. Following the November 2014 hacking of Sony Pictures’ computers, emails between Sony Pictures Entertainment co-chairman Amy Pascal and president Doug Belgrad were released stating that Marvel wanted to include Spider-Man (whose film rights are licensed to Sony) in the film, but talks between the studios concerning this were believed to have broken down. However, in February 2015, Sony Pictures and Marvel Studios reached a licensing deal for the use of Spider-Man in an MCU film, and reports indicated that the character would indeed appear in Civil War. The Russos stated they were lobbying for months to include the character in the film. In January 2015, Mackie revealed that, in addition to Atlanta, filming locations would include Puerto Rico and Berlin, while the Russo brothers confirmed that Scarlett Johansson would return in the film as Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow. Editor Jeffrey Ford, who worked on The Winter Soldier, also signed on for Civil War. In March 2015, Jeremy Renner was revealed to be reprising his role as Clint Barton / Hawkeye. The next month, it was revealed that the film would be converted to 3D in post-production, and that Brühl would be playing Helmut Zemo. Additionally, Elizabeth Olsen revealed she would reprise her role in the film as Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch.

Trivia

  • Vision, Hawkeye, Ant-Man, and Scarlet Witch weren’t part of the original comic book storyline. The first three were dead at the time, while Wanda was missing and insane.
  • The film shows a bond beginning to form between Scarlet Witch and Vision, who were married for a while in the comic books.
  • Although she is never mentioned as a mutant (Twentieth Century Fox owned the term rights at that time), Scarlet Witch is the only mutant among the Avengers in this movie, and she is seen with a collar when locked in Raft Prision, which can be a reference to the X-Gene Inhibitor Collar, created in the comics by Bolivar Trask to suppress mutant powers. The collar has been featured before in X-2: X-Men United (2003) and X-Men: Days Of Future Past (2014).
  • Release & Reception

    Captain America: Civil War premiered at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood on April 12, 2016, and was screened at CinemaCon 2016 on April 13. The film’s Southeast Asia premiere was held on April 21 at the Marina Bay Sands resort in Singapore, while the European premiere took place at Vue Cinemas in Westfield London on April 26. The film was released internationally starting from April 27, releasing in 61 countries its first weekend, including the United Kingdom on April 29. The North America release on May 6, took place in over 4,200 theaters, of which 3,300 were in 3D, along with 378 IMAX theaters, 480 premium large-format, and 161 D-Box locations. Internationally, the film opened in 955 IMAX theaters, while South Korea saw Civil War open in an “unprecedented” 1,989 theaters. Captain America: Civil War was the first film released in Phase Three of the MCU. In September 2014, TNT acquired the cable broadcast rights for Captain America: Civil War to air two years after its theatrical release.

    The review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes reported a 91% approval rating with an average score of 7.72/10, based on 406 reviews. The website’s critical consensus reads, “Captain America: Civil War begins the next wave of Marvel movies with an action-packed superhero blockbuster boasting a decidedly non-cartoonish plot and the courage to explore thought-provoking themes.” Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned a score of 75 out of 100 based on 52 critics, indicating “generally favorable reviews”. Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an “A” grade on an A+ to F scale, while PostTrak reported filmgoers gave it an 88% overall positive score and a 75% “definite recommend”.

    Justin Chang of Variety called it “the most mature and substantive picture to have yet emerged from the Marvel Cinematic Universe.” Sheri Linden of The Hollywood Reporter said, “Call it ‘civil war’ or call it brand extension; call it a ‘cinematic universe’ or a corporate behemoth—the latest Marvel extravaganza furthers the studio’s cross-pollination of action franchises in a way that’s sure to satisfy devotees.” Robbie Collin of The Daily Telegraph wrote, “This is the cinematic superhero showdown you’ve dreamt of since childhood, precisely because that’s everything—and all—it wants to be.” Catherine Shoard of The Guardian called it, “a huge aspartame rush of a film: a giant irresistible snack, not nutritious, but very tasty.” Richard Roeper of the Chicago Sun-Times wrote, “Kudos to co-directors Anthony and Joe Russo and the team of writers for juggling more than a dozen comic-book characters and nearly that many plot lines, and only occasionally getting us (and by us I mean me) lost in the geek weeds.” Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times said, “If you live and breathe Marvel, this is one of the MCU’s stronger offerings. If you are a spy coming in from the cold, the answer is not so clear.” A. O. Scott of The New York Times wrote, “Captain America: Civil War does not in any way transcend the conventions of the genre. On the contrary: It succeeds because it doesn’t really try.”

    Conversely, Stephen Whitty of the New York Daily News said, “Although it’s called Captain America: Civil War, the latest Marvel movie is actually a supersized Avengers picture—overstuffed to bursting. And sometimes during its two and a half hour running time, it just goes bust.” Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle said, “As a work of thought, Civil War is compromised, but at least there are thoughts to compromise. As an action film, it has its moments, but aside from the big opening sequence—the action scenes are a bit flat.” Andrew O’Hehir writing for Salon said, “Much of Captain America: Civil War is just the laborious working-out of leftover dangling plot elements from Captain America: The Winter Soldier two summers ago.” While Nicholas Barber of BBC gave the film a generally favorable review, praising both its visuals and action sequences, he criticized the fact that there was “no cogent reason for any of [the Avengers] to be on one side or the other, which is why their inevitable dust-up feels like a game of dodgeball in a school playground.” Mark Millar, writer of the “Civil War” comic storyline on which the film was based, felt the film “had a good opening twenty [minutes], but then I honestly can’t remember what the movie was about.” He also felt the film lacked levity, especially considering the Russo brothers’ background in comedy.

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